Breaking the Glass

Breaking of the GlassThe Breaking of the Glass symbolizes the destruction of the Jewish temple in Jerusalem.  Couples include this tradition in their wedding ceremony as it symbolizes the absolute finality of the marital covenant. Just as the broken pieces of glass can never be put back together and returned to its former state, so the covenant of marriage irrevocably binds the new husband and wife in their new state of marriage.

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The breaking of the glass is one of the most beloved traditions of a Jewish wedding ceremony.

This goblet was created especially for the treasured moment when the BRIDE and GROOM sanctify their marriage.

This ancient practice has been interpreted in many ways.

As a symbol of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, the glass reminds us of sadness even in during the most joyous of occasions.

Another view is that a broken glass cannot be mended and this reflects the permanence of marriage.

After the wedding, the BRIDE and GROOM will be changed forever.

Some consider the fragility of glass as a symbol of the frailty of human relationships.

Even as BRIDE and GROOM strengthens their relationship with the act of marriage, they must remember the care required to maintain this bond as they settle into their life together.

No matter what the interpretation, the breaking of the glass is an important part of any Jewish wedding and marks the beginning of a new life together.

After GROOM breaks the glass, I invite everyone to shout the Hebrew words “Mazel Tov,” meaning “Good Luck” and “Congratulations.”

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The final act of this ceremony is the shattering of the glass.

This old custom has many traditions, with many interpretations.

At one time it was meant to scare off demons who frequent celebrations.

Today, the fragility of the glass suggests the frailty of human relationships.

The bride and groom – and everyone –that they should consider these marriage vows as an IRREVOCABLE ACT.

Just as permanent and final as the breaking of this glass is unchangeable.

The glass is broken to protect this marriage with the implied prayer.

”May your bond of love be as difficult to break, as it would be to put back together these pieces of glass.”

Knowing that this marriage is permanent, the Bride and Groom should strive every day to show each other love and respect and happiness.

After GROOM breaks the glass, I invite everyone to shout the Hebrew words “Mazel Tov,” meaning “Good Luck” and “Congratulations.”

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BRIDE and GROOM, this glass symbolizes the clarity of your love for each other and the shattering of your old separate lives as you begin anew together.

As you break the glass, all of our blessings will be bestowed upon you.

It is the tradition for everyone present to shout “mazeltov” as the groom stomps the wedding goblet.

In Hebrew, this means ‘congratulations.’

The sound of the glass breaking is also a signal saying, “Let the party begin!”

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Like your marriage, this glass is a beautiful thing.

It’s clean and clear, allowing sunshine to flow through it.

If cared for properly, it can last a lifetime.

Like a marriage though, it can also be quite frail.

We stomp the glass at the end of a wedding ceremony to remind you that just as your foot can shatter this glass, so too a single thoughtless act cause irreparable harm to your marriage.

When you entered into marriage today, you committed an irrevocable act – permanent and final.

As you stomp this glass at the finish of the ceremony, so too will you be committing an irrevocable act.

It can no more be undone than this glass could be made whole again.

Cherish each other with the love and respect the love of your life deserves.

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The traditional breaking of the glass marks the end of the ceremony and the beginning of the celebration.

As GROOM breaks the glass, I invite everyone to shout “Mazel Tov,” which means “Congratulations” and “Good Luck.”

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We end the ceremony with the traditional breaking of the glass.

Breaking this glass symbolizes the permanent change this marriage covenant makes in BRIDE and GROOM’s lives.

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It is a Jewish custom to end the wedding ceremony with the breaking of a glass.

We do not know the exact origin of the custom.

Some people say that the breaking of the glass symbolizes the irrevocable change in the lives of the couple standing before us; other say it has its roots in superstition when people broke glasses to scare away evil spirits from such lucky people as the bride and groom.

Whatever its beginnings, the breaking of the glass now has many interpretations, one of which says that even in the moment of our greatest joy, we should have a responsibility to help relieve some of that pain and suffering.

And, of course, the breaking of the glass marks the beginning of the celebration.

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We conclude this ceremony with the breaking of the glass.

It is a joyous ceremony.

The fragility of the glass suggests the frailty of human relationships.

The glass is broken to protect this marriage with the implied prayer:

May your bond of love be as difficult to break as it would be to put together the pieces of this glass.

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May the breaking of this glass remind you of the fragility of human relationships.

A broken glass cannot be mended, and likewise marriage is irrevocable.

As this glass shatters, so may your marriage never break.